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Tuesday, November 10
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Tuesday November 10, 2015 7:30am - 9:30am
Plenary Hall 1st floor

8:00am

Exhibit Hall Opens
Tuesday November 10, 2015 8:00am - 4:00pm
Exhibit Hall 1st floor

8:45am

Welcome & Opening
  • J. Lynn Griesemer, Associate Vice-President, Economic Development, University of Massachusetts President's Office; Executive Director, UMass Donahue Institute
        
“A Student, a Teacher, and a Robot: The Story of Richbot 3000”
        
  • Heidi Riccio, Principal/Director, Medford Vocational Technical High School
  • Hunter Raymond, Student, Bunker Hill Community College
  • Richard Cormio, Teacher, Medford Vocational Technical High School
  • Samuel Christy, Teacher, Medford Vocational Technical High School

Tuesday November 10, 2015 8:45am - 9:30am
Plenary Hall 1st floor

9:00am

Test 1
Test

Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:00am - 9:30am
Atrium B 3rd floor

9:30am

Break
Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:30am - 9:50am

9:50am

10 Quick Wins for STEM Integration and Programming
Nipmuc Regional High School leaders will provide attendees with the chance to learn 10 simple strategies to develop sustainable STEM programming and build a school-wide culture of STEM. Highlighting the steps taken by teachers and administrators at Nipmuc Regional High School, the session will demonstrate how all secondary schools can develop meaningful STEM programming that excites students, develop connections to the STEM community, provide opportunities to collaborate with colleges and universities, and partner students with STEM professionals. The audience will walk away from the session with 10 strategies that could be easily and inexpensively applied in schools of all sizes and characteristics.

Speaker(s)
JC

John Clements

Principal, Nipmuc Regional High School
MA

Mary Anne Moran

Associate Principal, Nipmuc Regional High School



Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

An Effective Professional Development Model for Training Science Teacher Leaders K-12
In a new model of professional development, K-12 teachers across five school districts in the greater Boston area are working to become science teacher leaders. That is, reflective practitioners supporting their colleagues and enhancing science learning throughout their district. In year 1 of this two-year program, teachers examine best practices for science teaching, explore vertical articulation of curriculum, and develop a better understanding of the Science and Engineering Practices and NGSS at different grade levels. At the heart of the training is the sharing of videotaped lessons among teachers, who learn to observe colleagues' lessons, examine student work, and provide supportive feedback related to science content, practices, and pedagogy. Year 2 of the program is devoted to teachers taking on leadership roles in their districts that promote both their personal growth and district priorities, all while remaining in the classroom. During this session, program organizers will acquaint attendees with the model and the wide range of work that Fellows in the program are engaged in within their districts. Fellows will share their experiences in the program and share videotaped CCLS group sessions. Posters of projects conducted by year 2 Fellows will be available for viewing. K-12 classroom teachers and science administrators will all benefit from this presentation. Attendees will be given an opportunity to work together to discuss how elements of the program might be implemented in their own districts.

Moderator
DR

Dianne Rees

Director of Science K-12, Braintree Public Schools

Speaker(s)
LD

Laura Degelmann

Wipro SEF Fellow, Linden STEAM Academy, Malden Public Schools
AE

Arthur Eisenkraft

Director/COSMIC (Center for Science and Math in Context), UMass Boston


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Best Practice: Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School Leading Global STEM Classroom™ Programs in MA

Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School (DYRHS) has been pioneering the innovative Global STEM Classroom™ collaboration program since 2011. The concept of the program was created by and implemented at DYRHS under the mentorship of Larisa Schelkin, the Founder and CEO of the Global STEM Education Center.

Every year, about 45 students in grades 8-10 participate in a variety of semester-long courses collaborating with students from different countries including England, France, Mexico, Norway, Russia, and Ukraine. In the session, DYRHS students will present their work done in the four courses:

1. "My Blue Planet" course addresses the quality and availability of clean drinking water around the globe.

2. "The Space Exploration" course addresses scientific, technological, societal, and economic issues surrounding the near-Earth and deep space exploration and a possibility of establishing human settlements on other planets.

3. "The NASA's GRACE satellites and the Climate Change" course is dedicated to the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) program that allows precise observations of ice sheets and climate change from space.

4. "Nanotechnology" course focuses of the revolutionary technology of super-small particles and its application in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine.

The session will be a discussion of the program goals, methods, and results provided from the perspective of a teacher, an administrator, the program founder, and students who will share their authentic experiences in this unique and innovative program.


Speaker(s)
SA

Sawer Adamaitis

10th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
JS

Julia Sigalovsky, Ph. D.

Teacher, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
PD

Paula DeZouza

12th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
KJ

Kenneth Jenks

Principal, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
JL

Jaida Lawrence

9th Grade, Dennis Yarmouth Regional High School
AM

Alyssa Melendez

11th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
HN

Hennel Naquines

10th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
HP

Harsh Patel

10th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School
AR

Amelia Rubin

11th Grade, Dennis Yarmouth Regional High School
LS

Larisa Schelkin

CEO & Founder, Global STEM Education Center, Inc
DW

Drew Weinert

10th Grade, Dennis-Yarmouth Regional High School


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Bridging the Gap Between Students and Employers: The NECC Laboratory Science Program
This session will provide an analysis of the strengths and challenges faced by the Laboratory Science Program at Northern Essex Community College. This program was developed as an alternative educational pathway for students interested in a shorter path to a career in the sciences. Curriculum was developed in close alignment with industry requirements for entry level lab technician skills. In particular, a mandatory externship requirement helps students bridge the gap between the classroom and the industry lab. As part of this session, the results of five years of student evaluations by industry externship supervisors will be presented as evidence of the effectiveness of the program curriculum and externship in preparing students for entry level work as laboratory technicians in regional industry. A discussion of currently tested strategies for recruitment will also be presented.

Moderator
MW

Marguerite White-Jeanneau

Associate Professor and Laboratory Science Program Coordinator, Northern Essex Community College

Speaker(s)
MC

Mike Cross

Associate Professor, Northern Essex Community College
NC

Noemi Custodia-Lora

Executive Director of Lawrence Campus & Community Relations, Northern Essex Community College
KM

Kevin Mitchell

Associate Professor, Northern Essex Community College
KW

Kimberly Waligora

Associate Professor, Northern Essex Community College


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Building Brains with Boxes!
Join us to investigate how to support young children's developing STEM skills using all kinds of boxes! Participants will explore how children's learning is grounded in hands-on experiences and gain understanding of how to engage children's curiosity through the use of inquiry science methods. Discussion of what STEM means in early childhood and the Massachusetts Science and Technology/Engineering Standards will be included. Much of the session will be devoted to playing with boxes and investigating how creative project-based experiences align with Massachusetts standards and guidelines, as well as Teaching Strategies GOLD Objectives for Development and Learning. Adaptations for mixed ages and different learning styles will also be discussed. Participants will receive a list of resources and useful handouts.

Speaker(s)
JD

Joanna Doyle

Director of Training and Education, Clarendon Early Education Services, Inc.
RP

Rosalina Pinto

All System Director, Clarendon Early Education Services, Inc.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Building to STEM Plan 3.0: Beacons of Success and Leveraging National Connections
STEM Plan 3.0 is scheduled to be released at the 2016 STEM Summit. In preparation for this next revision, the STEM Council invites members of the STEM Community to participate in small group discussions to discuss how STEM Plan 2.0 has impacted the Pipeline, point to areas of local and statewide success in moving these goals forward, and connections to national STEM Plans and agenda to leverage resources and opportunities.  Participants in this session will engage in small group discussions that will be led by 6-sigma-like trained facilitators.

Moderator
JN

Janet Nicholas

Director, Marketing Strategy and Planning, Dassault Systemes

Speaker(s)
AB

Al Bunshaft

President and CEO, Dassault Systemes Government Solutions
AS

Allison Scheff Little

Executive Director of STEM, MA Department of Higher Education


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD
  • Strand Policy
  • Session Type Roundtable/Discussion Group

9:50am

Early Engagement and Growth for the STEM Professional

With a recovering economy, the market for STEM employees is becoming increasingly competitive and supply is often not able to meet demand. The challenge of attracting and maintaining potential talented employees can be more difficult in some geographic locations. This session discusses the multiple initiatives that General Dynamics Mission Systems has taken to attract and retain employees in the Berkshires of western Massachusetts.

This session will describe how General Dynamics collaborated with other local companies to engage talent through a county-wide internship program that allows interns an opportunity to learn about other companies within the county, participate in social and cultural activities as well as professional development activities in the region and to network with potential colleagues. Additionally, the company has introduced several programs that inspire interest in STEM at an early age including:

- Annual High School Robotics Competition

- Shadow Day/Facility Tours

- After School Engineering Program

- DIGITS program

General Dynamics believes that programs and opportunities that engage students' interest throughout their education and as they enter the workforce is an effective approach for recruiting young employees. Providing tools and mentoring programs for career development assists in retaining and growing the skills of that workforce. This session is an opportunity to share these processes and solicit best practices from other STEM professionals.


Speaker(s)
BB

Brenda Burdick

Sr. Manager, Marketing and Public Relations, General Dynamics Mission Systems
BM

Beth Mitchell

Director of Engineering, General Dynamics Mission Systems



Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Field Data is Awesome Data: How to Use Real Science to do Real Math
How can we make data more exciting for students (and ourselves)? By having them collect it themselves, as part of authentic citizen science projects! By connecting field-based data collection to in-class data analysis, students make the connection between all those points on a graph and the soil, water, trees or bugs they just felt, saw, and explored. The data itself becomes more meaningful so the data analysis becomes more worthwhile. Instead of seeing graphing or analysis as a dry exercise, students begin to develop an understanding that data can tell us a story. If the data they collect is part of a larger conservation effort, students are often even more motivated to participate. This session will use programs developed by Mass Audubon as an example of how to engage students in real-world data collection, followed by real-world data analysis. 

Moderator
JF

Jennifer Feller

Education Manager, Drumlin Farm, Mass Audubon

Speaker(s)
AL

Adrienne Lennon

Teacher Naturalist, Joppa Flats Wildlife Sanctuary, Mass Audubon
KS

Kris Scopinich

Director of Education, Mass Audubon


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Fusing STEM & Youth Development: A New Approach to Summer Learning

Learn how Boston After School & Beyond and the Providence After School Alliance use targeted professional development to support collaborative teaching between STEM-focused community educators and middle school teachers within their summer learning programs. Bridging the gap between formal and informal education, both programs focus on integrating Next Generation Science Standards' science & engineering practices in order to promote overall program quality and social-emotional learning outcomes. Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the benefits and challenges of this model, explore strategies for optimizing results, and have an opportunity to ask participating educators about their experiences.


Speaker(s)
ED

Ellen Dickenson

Program Director, Partnerships & STEM, Boston After School & Beyond
RD

Renee DiPippo

Outreach Specialist, Biomes Marine Biology Center
AD

Ann Durham

Director of Quality Initiatives, Providence After School Alliance
LE

Lydia Emmons

Director of College & Career Pathways, Sociedad Latina


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Innovation in Biotechnology Education

This session will discuss high school biotechnology education with educators and representatives of foundations, industry, and government. Brockton High School has developed an innovative, four-year non-vocational biotechnology pathway. Innovative teaching methods are used to increase literacy and cutting edge research tools are used to promote math skills and critical thinking. 

The biotechnology pathway was designed to help students learn in a horizontally and vertically integrated thematic pathway. Toward that goal, ethical, social and political issues are weaved into the students' scientific explorations. Technical report writing, lab notebooks, lab reports, web-based student portfolios, and literary analysis are all methods used to enhance literacy skills.

We are transforming the qualitative approach to life sciences to one that is more quantitative. We will do this through our expanded use of digital probeware, reporter assays, bioinformatics and quantitative PCR. To the extent that we know, this will be the first time qPCR will be routinely utilized as a hands-on teaching tool in a high school classroom. This work will help our students enter post-secondary education and the workforce with greater mathematical reasoning, scientific practices and content expertise.


Moderator
JS

Jonathan Shapiro

Science Department Head, Brockton High School

Speaker(s)
DM

David Mangus

Biotechnology Teacher, Brockton High School
AM

Andy Martin

Program Coordinator, Youth CareerConnect, Brockton Area WIB
NO

Nicole Otero

Biotechnology Teacher, Brockton High School


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Proven Strategies in Fostering and Retaining STEM Students

In an ideal world, every undergarduate majoring in STEM would, in addition to their formal course load, engage in research, have a strong network of formal and informal mentors and advisors, volunteer for a variety of STEM outreach activities, and participate in a rich offering of STEM-related social events. The positive impact of these opportunities has well documented impacts on retention for STEM students in general and for underrepresented minority students in particular. This panel presentation will introduce successful model programs that provide such opportunities fostering engagement and improving retention of students in STEM.

Following the panel presentation, participants will engage with the stakeholders reflecting on the programs, their impact, and strategies for implementation and assessment.

The programs featured include:

- Wentworth Institute of Technology's RAMP precollege summer bridge program which familiarizes students with a college learning environment and forms a cohort of classmates from similar backgrounds providing a foundation of support for transition to campus in the fall.

- Holy Cross will share four interventions that have promoted persistence including a pre-college bridge program, a first-year research program, peer assisted learning in chemistry, and an extended-time course in calculus.

- UMass Boston will discuss the creation of the Student Success Center and the implementation of the Freshman Success Community, which have a tremendous impact on retention and achievement, especially for underrepresented minority students.

- UMass Amherst's STEM Ambassadors Program is a novel hierarchical mentoring program that provides students with formal and informal advising and mentoring opportunities along with a diverse suite of retention activities and events.


Moderator
RW

Renee White

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, Simmons College

Speaker(s)
AA

Arielle Arsenault-Benoit

Interim Director, STEM Ambassadors Program, UMass Amherst
FE

Felecia Edwards

Associate Director, Student Success Center, UMass Boston
EM

Erik Miller

Director, Center for Community and Learning Partnerships, Wentworth Institute of Technology
KM

Kenneth Mills

Professor of Chemistry, College of the Holy Cross


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

STEM in the Infant and Toddler Classroom
This training is geared toward teachers who are looking to expand their current STEM offerings, as well as those who are interested in starting to bring STEM concepts to their younger children. The key concepts to be addressed are what does STEM encompass, what does it look like with infants and toddlers, and how do you make it meaningful. We will discuss each branch and its role in the classroom. For example, technology is not just computers and iPads. It includes all of the tools that children use to explore their world, such as hand lenses, bug nets, pipettes, and tongs to name a few. Educators will participate in hands-on activities that include infant/toddler-safe recipes for sensory exploration and engineering concepts like block play, ramps, and pulleys. Participants will also examine children's literature to discover key STEM concepts within the story and how to transform those concepts into investigations. Participants will have opportunities to view videos and photos of infants and toddlers engaging in STEM. The organizing framework of Engage, Explore, and Reflect will also be discussed. There will be time for discussions as a large group, as well as some small group work. Participants will walk away with concrete activities to take back to their classrooms. Participants will also gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which they can incorporate STEM practices into their classroom with any age group but specifically with infants and toddlers.

Speaker(s)
CC

Charlene Cross

Toddler Teacher, The Williston Northampton Children's Center
KD

Keira Durrett

Director, The Williston Northampton Children's Center


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Successful Models for Student Innovation and Entrepreneurship in High School

An individual’s ability to innovate and act entrepreneurially is often the catalyst that drives enormous gains for society and cuts across all industries. Instilling these skills and attributes in high school students is critical to their future success and necessary to help solve current global challenges. This session presents two complementary and successful models: a classroom curriculum and an online collaboration. Attendees can share ideas and explore how these models and their rubrics may be leveraged to inspire the next generation of entrepreneurs and innovators.

At Georgetown High School in Massachusetts, innovation is critical to a required 9th grade course where students identify a problem and invent a product or service to solve the problem. Students design prototypes and then apply concepts of entrepreneurship to create a business plan to launch their product/service. Students gain feedback through online blogs and make video “infomercials” about their inventions for an end-of-course showcase.

Project Lead the Way’s web-based “Innovation Portal” enables students, teachers, and mentors to build and collaborate on problem-solving projects, and then connect with opportunities offered by universities, businesses, and industry. This secure portal is available at no charge. Students upload information and invite others to comment on their work. The Portal includes a portfolio template, scored examples, and a research-based rubric. All are organized around a design process that opens participation to anyone and any project topic.

Join us as we explore how these two programs can engage your high school students in designing and implementing innovative solutions to real-world problems.

 


Moderator
CB

Cora Beth Abel

President & CEO, MA State Science & Engineering Fair

Speaker(s)
JD

Julie DeRoche

Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Georgetown Public Schools
MS

Mark Schroll

Senior Director of Strategic Partnerships, Project Lead The Way



Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

Supporting the Rollout of the Revised MA STE Standards: A Partnership of Research and Practice

This is a critical time in K-12 science education, as the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE) moves forward with the adoption of the revised MA Science and Technology/Engineering (STE) standards. Districts and schools will be working to adjust programs and curriculum to reflect key changes in student expectations, particularly in regard to the inclusion of science and engineering practices, a focus on college and career readiness, and coherent progressions of learning across years. To support districts during this transition, ESE is bringing together a number of partners to support districts in developing implementation plans, sharing resources and curriculum that results in student learning called for in the revised STE standards. This panel discussion is targeted at K-12 educators, administrators, and policymakers, and aims to inform conversation about the rollout, adoption, and implementation of the revised MA STE standards. Panel members, including representatives from WGBH, the Museum of Science, Boston, and district leadership, will discuss strategies and initiatives already underway, how that is coordinated with ESE and other stakeholders, and what will be needed in future years.   


Moderator
JF

Jacob Foster

Acting Director, STEM, MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

Speaker(s)
RC

Rachel Connolly

Director of STEM Education, WGBH/PBS LearningMedia
CD

Cove Davis

Executive Administrator for Curriculum and Assessment, The Five District Partnership
MF

Michael Fredette

Principal, East Longmeadow Public Schools
LK

Lesley Kennedy

Manager, Teacher Professional Development, Museum of Science, Boston


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

9:50am

The Effect of Mentoring: The Million Women Mentors Initiative

While women comprise 50% of the U.S. workforce, just 24% are in STEM fields, a statistic that has held constant for nearly the last decade. Statistics show that early access to mentors has a profound effect on the recruitment and retention of young girls and women in STEM fields. Million Women Mentors®, an initiative of STEMconnector®, is a national movement which supports the engagement of one million STEM mentors (male and female) to increase the number of girls and women from school age to work age continuum to persist and succeed in STEM programs and careers by the year 2018. By providing a central repository of mentors and girls serving STEM organizations, as well as extensive materials with strategies for successful mentoring, the hope is that all girls and young women interested in STEM will have access to the support and guidance needed to persist in science.


Speaker(s)
SB

Sheila Boyington

President, Thinking Media; National Senior Advisor-STEMconnector®/Million Women Mentors®
JR

Jennifer Roecklein-Canfield

Team Lead, Southern New England Girls Collaborative Project


Tuesday November 10, 2015 9:50am - 11:00am
Location TBD

11:00am

Break
Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:00am - 11:20am

11:20am

A Discussion with Massachusetts Education Commissioners: Statewide Programs that Support the STEM Plan

The Commissioners will discuss programs underway that address the five goals of the Massachusetts STEM Plan: Increase student interest in STEM; Increase achievement among all Pre-K-12 students in order to prepare graduates to be civically and college and/or career ready; Increase the percentage of skilled educators who teach Pre-K-16 STEM; Increase the percent of students completing post-secondary degrees or certificates in STEM; STEM degrees and certificate attainment will be aligned with corresponding opportunity in STEM-related fields to match the state’s workforce needs for a STEM talent pipeline.


Moderator
LL

Laurie Leshin

President, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Speaker(s)
MC

Mitchell Chester

Commissioner of Elementary and Secondary Education
CS

Carlos Santiago

Commissioner of Higher Education


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Plenary Hall 1st floor
  • Strand Policy
  • Session Type Panel

11:20am

Accept the Challenge: Design Meaningful Projects
Implementing an entire project-based learning unit that aligns with the curriculum frameworks can seem like a daunting task. How can you effectively and authentically bring STEM Problem-Based Learning(PBL) into your classroom?  How can you simultaneously meet all the requirements for state testing? Experience an entire PBL unit from start to finish through a student lens: brainstorm, research, develop, and produce an alternative energy solution that connects to the “internet of things”.  In this session, you will learn how to structure an engaging interdisciplinary STEM project that can be easily adapted to your classroom curriculum.  Walk away with documents, strategies and best practices that can be implemented immediately.

Speaker(s)
SB

Scott Brown

Science Teacher, Marlborough Public Schools
PC

Paul Ciavola

English Teacher, Marlborough Public Schools
JD

Joanne D'Agostino

Engineering Teacher, Marlborough Public Schools
HK

Heather Kohn

Math Teacher, Marlborough Public Schools
SV

Sheldon Vigeant

Social Studies Teacher, Marlborough Public Schools


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Breaking Down Barriers: Social and Cultural Contributors to Ensure STEM for All

Role models, hands-on projects, real-world applications. We know what it takes to create engaging STEM programming. Or do we? Why does the Commonwealth still face challenges reaching diverse populations and increasing their interest and achievement? How do we need to work together to support our students as STEM learners and as whole persons? 

In this interactive and dynamic workshop, several case studies, addressing areas such as hip hop ed/youth culture, citizen science, culturally appropriate training for role models, will stimulate discussion and scrutiny of strategies that address social and cultural barriers in STEM for middle and high school students, particularly those in underserved and underrepresented populations. Participants will work in small thematic groups and then share out with the larger group. A Google document of all ideas will be created and shared with all participants.

We anticipate that strategies for inclusion will be applicable to the entire STEM learning ecosystem, from students in lower grades and those entering college, and to the out-of-school community. 

We welcome participation and contributions from anyone looking to make a real difference in STEM learning for underserved populations. Be prepared to learn, to share success or challenges, to confront implicit bias, and to create community between educators, industry practitioners, and students.

Case studies will be made available on the Summit website via a link prior to the conference. 


Speaker(s)
TC

Tracy Callahan

Community Lab Director, Biogen
CC

Connie Chow

Board member, Massachusetts Academy of Sciences



Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Developing Young Children’s Numbersense and Mathematics Readiness through Sidewalk Math

"Studies find that the mathematics knowledge acquired in early childhood and early elementary grades is a critical foundation for long-term student success." (The National Governors Association Paper, 2014)

Recognizing the importance of supporting teachers and caregivers in developing number sense and mathematics readiness for all children, a partnership of community members collaborated school leaders to bring Sidewalk Math to young children in their community. Sidewalk Math is designed to engage young children in learning mathematical patterns by walking, hopping, jumping, and skipping through colorful designs painted on sidewalks, school hallways and playgrounds. Sidewalk Math has been collaboratively designed by mathematics educators to build critical number sense skills in young children, by designers to engage children in kinesthetic learning, and by early childhood educators to ensure caregivers feel confident in practicing counting and patternmaking with children.

In this workshop we will engage participants in interacting with the Sidewalk Math patterns; examine the “We Count” teaching resources designed for teachers and caregivers to engage their children with the patterns; explore the variety of educational resources found in "The Footbook: Steps to Developing Numbersense in Young Children” that accompanies Sidewalk Math; and identify strategies for developing partnerships to bring Sidewalk Math to their community.

The design team of mathematics educators, university faculty, and school leaders who created Sidewalk Math will lead this workshop. This will ensure that all participants have the opportunity to explore these resources with colleagues able to support them in considering how to bring this project back to their own community.


Speaker(s)
AB

Art Bardige

Mathematician & Educator, CEO, Sustainablearning
LC

Lisa Carignan

Instructional Coach, Columbus Park Preparatory Academy, Worcester
SD

Siobhan Dennis

Principal, Columbus Park Preparatory Academy, Worcester
YL

Yvonne Liu-Constant

Assistant Professor, Lesley University
MB

Martha Barry McKenna

University Professor & Director of the Creativity Commons, Lesley University


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Exploring the Landscape of Engineering Education in Massachusetts

The NSF-funded project entitled Massachusetts Engineering Innovation and Dissemination Community (MEIDC) is conducting an analysis of K-12 engineering education in the greater Boston area to understand 1) the types and levels of connections and collaborations–past and current; 2) the types and levels of resources that have been committed and are available; and, 3) key issues. This session offers attendees the chance to hear about the data the presenters have gathered with respect to these topics (copies of the report will be provided), and for attendees to share how they are approaching engineering education, what challenges and opportunities they face, and the types of collaborations that would help them move forward more effectively with their efforts.

This session is recommended for those interested in and contributing to engineering education in K-12 formal and informal education environments, including but not limited to researchers, industry and IHE outreach programs, educators and administrators, non-profit support providers, and policy-makers.

 


Speaker(s)
CM

Catherine McCulloch

Project Director, Education Development Center, Inc.
TM

Tracy McMahon

Research Associate, Education Development Center, Inc.
DN

Darryl N. Williams

Research Associate Professor, Tufts University


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Growing the STEM Workforce: Engaging Women & Underrepresented Minorities in Computer Science
Computer Science is one of the most rewarding and challenging undergraduate degrees a college student can earn. Yet, only 0.7% of college students graduate from American colleges with a Computer Science degree each year when the technology industry demand is so high. Recent statistics about the low number of women and underrepresented minority employees in many of the large technology companies further stress the opportunity to build a diverse workforce by introducing a more diverse set of students to computer science.

In this panel, hear from community leaders about programs in Massachusetts that are exploring ways to engage young women and a more diverse set of students to learn to code.


Moderator
AS

Aimee Sprung

Microsoft

Speaker(s)
DD

David Delmar

Founder, Resilient Coders
MI

Milton Irving

Executive Director, Timothy Smith Network
LK

Lonsdale Koester

Executive Director, Science Club for Girls


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

How Can the Arts Improve STEM Outcomes for Students?
This session will address many questions about how adding arts to STEM learning can help educators meet the goals of the Massachusetts STEM Plan 2.0 by increasing engagement, mastery, and aspirations. After a short introductory film, participants will experience integrated learning firsthand as they move through interactive demonstrations of field-tested projects where the arts are integrated into STEM learning. Each project shows how students were challenged to use their STEM knowledge in creating visual and performing arts pieces. These will be examples from residencies implemented by Flying Cloud Institute in lower elementary, middle, and high schools in Berkshire County including robotics, ceramic chemistry, cyanotype photography, dance, theater, and 2-D design. Demonstrations will be facilitated by specialists from Flying Cloud Institute and representatives from the participating schools: administrators, classroom teachers, art teachers, science teachers, and students. They will share their experiences in securing funding; aligning projects with state standards and school curricula; managing classroom time and materials; and the outcomes achieved for all learners. Participants are encouraged to ask questions of the facilitators and share their own experiences.

Speaker(s)
DA

Dale Abrams

Director of Science Education in the Schools, Flying Cloud Institute
AB

Alexandra Benton

Art Teacher, Muddy Brook Elementary School
LB

Lindsey Berkowitz

Engineering Educator, Flying Cloud Institute
MB

Mary Berle

Principal, Muddy Brook Elementary School
JS

Jane S. Burke

Founding Director, Flying Cloud Institute
DD

Diane Daily

Creative Youth Development Programs Manager, Massachusetts Cultural Council
SD

Sarah DiFazio

Classroom teacher, Muddy Brook Elementary School
SG

Stephanie Graham

Art teacher, Southern Berkshire Regional Schools
KS

Kristen Sparhawk

SMArt Education Director, Flying Cloud Institute


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Impactful Teaching and Learning and Environmental Restoration through Citizen Science

From the White House, across the nation and back, learn directly from Green Schools and our National Green Schools Society Student Leaders how to develop the next generation of environmentally innovative students and schools through Best E-STEM (Environment + STEM) Practices, project based learning, leadership, and action. Green Schools has been invited to participate and strategize in Climate Literacy and E-STEM conversation with our nation's top thought leaders ranging from President Obama, Vice President Biden, U.S. Dept. of Education Secretary Duncan, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, and Dr. Greene with a common goal to create a healthier, more sustainable and innovative future for people and planet through solutions that work!

Additionally, the STEM-C Curriculum and Community Enterprise for New York Harbor Restoration in New York City Public schools consists of five district resource pillars that when combined in practice will foster direct collaboration between teachers and STEM-C professionals, innovative methods for teaching in schools, afterschool curriculum, and aquarium-based programming, Ultimately, it is expandable to restoration, environmental research, and sustainability projects in national/international communities, creating extremely broad impacts on mainstream science pedagogy. The program exclusively engages public schools in neighborhoods with persistent poverty and low socio-economic indicators. The model demonstrates that physically engaged, field-based, authentic scientific research can provide systematic inequities to equalize learning for student groups currently under-represented in the STEM-C professions. The partners' extensive pedagogical experience and existing literature indicate that STEM-C teaching and learning is greatly enhanced when students practice authentic science inquiry, field research, and socially beneficial conservation.


Speaker(s)
LB

Lauren Birney

Assistant Professor of STEM Education, Pace University
JH

Jonathan Hill

Dean, The Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Pace University
RO

Robin Organ

Executive Director, Green Schools
HT

Hannah Traggis

Director of Students & Schools, Green Schools


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Integrating STEM Education Throughout a District or School

In order to prepare students for the future jobs that may not even exist today, students need to have strong skills and understandings of STEM concepts. The U.S. Department of Commerce estimates that jobs in STEM fields will grow 17 percent by 2018—nearly double the growth for non-STEM fields. By 2018, the U.S. will have more than 1.2 million unfilled STEM jobs because there will not be enough qualified workers to fill them. STEM is where jobs are today and where job growth will be in the future.

Anticipating this need, the Hudson and Medway Public School Districts and Saint Peter-Marian Central Catholic Junior/Senior High School implemented integrated STEM educational programs. During this session a panel of district representatives will discuss how the STEM programs were initiated at the schools, what professional development was provided to the teachers, and strategies to build community support for the new programs. Data on student performance and outcomes will also be presented.

Audience participation and discussion are encouraged during the session so all can learn from each other’s experiences.

Speaker(s)
AP

Armand Pires

Interim Superintendent, Medway Public Schools
ES

Ellen Schuck

Director of Technology, Hudson Public Schools
JV

Jennifer Vear

Teacher, St. Peter-Marian Central Catholic Jr./Sr. High School


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Leveraging 2- and 4-Year Partnerships and Student Research to Foster Student Success in STEM

At the national level, community colleges are powerful forces for transforming the scientific workforce because most college students from diverse backgrounds begin higher education there. Hundreds of thousands plan to transfer to 4-year institutions to earn a bachelor’s degree in a science-related field, but more work is needed to strengthen 2- and 4-year collaborations. The Stonehill College-Massasoit Community College (MCC) Science Transfer Initiative (STI) has the overall objective to create “purposeful interactions” between faculty and students that are critical to attract, retain, and graduate STEM students. This program provides early research experiences shown to increase retention in STEM and overall student outcomes. Although the benefits of early research are well established, most students do not have access to these types of opportunities while at the community college and upon transfer find it hard to compete for limited research positions.

The STI program aims to remove these barriers by providing research internships for: 1) high-school students the summer before they start at MCC through the STEM Start Academy; 2) first and second year MCC students in the Liberal Arts Transfer-Science program who intend to transfer to a four-year school in the sciences; and 3) MCC-Stonehill transfers the summer before they transfer. This multi-year program is meant to prepare students for intensive lab work and allow them to develop relationships with faculty and student mentors. During this session, ways to forge sustainable partnerships with four-year institutions, the adaptation of MCC’s research program, funding opportunities and outcomes of student participants will be discussed. 

Speaker(s)
MB

Michael Bankson

STEM Coordinator and Adjunct Biology Faculty, Massasoit Community College
RH

Rachel Hirst

Assistant Professor of Biology, Stonehill College


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Project-Based Learning + Real-World Manufacturing + Industry Mentors = Job-Driven STEM Education
The attainment of critical thinking skills through project-based learning is at the heart of STEM education. Then add the opportunities for students to immerse themselves into the manufacturing process and learning real-world technical skills from industry mentors. Put those three components together and it becomes a job-driven STEM educational program called the National Robotics League (NRL). The NRL highlights the importance of partnership models between educators and businesses in creating project-based learning opportunities that apply real-world manufacturing problems to solve. Closing the large and growing skills gap in the US will provide our youth with innumerable job opportunities, and employers with the talent they so desperately need to have sustained success. We will present a model that will highlight how successful partnerships between high school educators and manufacturers have paved the way for fun, applied learning opportunities for students. Our business/industry partners, post-secondary partners, community leaders, parents, administrators and students have, and will continue, to play an important role in our success as we build a STEM career pipeline for our students.

Moderator
ST

Steve Tamasi

CEO, Boston Centerless

Speaker(s)
SB

Sarah Brooks

NRL Program Manager, National Tool and Machining Association
JD

Joanna Dowling

President, The Custom Group Center for Manufacturing Technology
DP

David Petty

STEM Coordinator, Winchester High School
CZ

Cindy Zylkuski-Norris

Administrator, Boston Tooling & Machining Association


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

Science is Everywhere: In and Out of the Library
Across the Commonwealth when school closes for the day, children arrive at the public library to participate in a wide range of STEM-specific topics and programs. For the past seven years, selected Massachusetts libraries have been offering special after-school programs to engage elementary and middle school children in enrichment opportunities around a range of science and math topics. While based in libraries, these programs have successfully collaborated with a broad range of community organizations including schools, museums, science and nature centers, boys and girls clubs, parks and recreational facilities, local business, and institutions of higher education.

Speaker(s)
RC

Robert Carter

Children's Librarian, Winchester Public Library
JG

Jill Graboski

Assistant Director, Newton Free Library
CM

Cate Merlin

Teen & Special Projects Librarian, Peabody Institute Library
KM

Kathy Moran-Wallace

Head of Children's Services, Nevins Library, Methuen
SQ

Shelley Quezada

Educational Consultant, Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners
BR

Bernadette Rivard

Director, Bellingham Public Library



Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

STEM 2.0: Career Skills for a 21st Century STEM Worker

The STEM Innovation Task Force (SITF) is comprised of 36 industry, government, education, and non-profit leaders. Members include companies such as Cisco, Cognizant, Deloitte, Dow, Dassault Systemes, KPMG, PepsiCo, PTC, Sodexo, Tata Consultancy Services, Walmart as well as leading educators and governmental organizations. The SITF has a grand vision of “Accelerating sustainable STEM careers and wealth through innovation science and excellence in tomorrow’s new economy.” The task force will accomplish their agenda of developing STEM human capital through a number of high powered working groups that focus on certain priority areas of STEM innovation, including the STEM Career Accelerator Day, STEM 2.0, collaboration with the Million Women Mentors program, the STEM Higher Ed Council, and others.

This session will focus on an overview of all SITF programs with specific focus on STEM 2.0. STEM 2.0 defines capability platforms that lie in the gap employers see that exists today between what we require and what the current educational ecosystem is producing. This session, presented by the SITF co-chairs, touches on our collaboration with the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and will present ways for organizations to join the movement, to make a real impact!

Moderator
AB

Al Bunshaft

President and CEO, Dassault Systemes Government Solutions

Speaker(s)
SB

Sheila Boyington

President, Thinking Media; National Senior Advisor-STEMconnector®/Million Women Mentors®
BG

Balaji Ganapathy

Head, Workforce Effectiveness, North America, Tata Consultancy Services


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

STEM Education and Workforce in Northern New England: Report of the Councils
This session focuses on the unique opportunities and challenges that different statewide STEM strategies face across four New England states. During this session, attendees will hear from the Maine STEM Council, the Massachusetts STEM Council, the New Hampshire K-12 STEM Task Force, and the Vermont STEM Collaborative. The representative from each state will discuss the role of the Council in their state, metrics to measure success, mechanisms to act in its rule, and the life cycle of these groups. Attendees will benefit from hearing from other state Councils to provide new strategies to implement on their local level and have a deeper understanding of a broader sense of the STEM movement on a regional level. Attendees will also have a greater appreciation for the bigger picture of the overall nature of the politics, policy, leadership, education, and partnerships needed to move this agenda forward.

Moderator
DB

Doug Banks

Editor-in-Chief, Boston Business Journal

Speaker(s)
DA

David Allard

Outreach Manager, Office of Governor Gina Raimondo (RI)
RH

Robert Hallowell

Scientist, MIT Lincoln Laboratory
TK

Tom Keller

Executive Director, Maine STEM Council
AS

Allison Scheff Little

Executive Director of STEM, MA Department of Higher Education
RT

Regina Toolin

Associate Professor, University of Vermont


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

11:20am

What's the Flippin' Difference? The Implementation and Effectiveness of Flipped Learning
Flipped learning involves moving passive, background instruction outside of the classroom, reserving in-class time for student-centered learning activities that fortify and support long-lasting learning. The effectiveness of flipped learning over traditional, passive, lecture-based instruction has been demonstrated in published studies for years. However, many instructors remain resistant to adopting flipped learning for two well-founded reasons: (1) they lack the tools needed to implement flipped learning in their classroom and/or (2) they remain skeptical about the effectiveness of this approach. This session seeks to address both concerns. First, the design of an effectively implemented flipped course in undergraduate genetics will be presented so that instructors will have the tools needed to implement a similar approach in their own classrooms. Second, the results of a comparison study will be shared, where two parallel sections of undergraduate genetics were offered; one flipped and the other traditional, with active learning components integrated throughout.  With these results in hand, participants will leave this session able to make informed choices regarding the effectiveness and usefulness of adopting flipped learning and the need for active learning in the college classroom.

Speaker(s)
TM

Thomas Mennella

Associate Professor of Biology, Bay Path University


Tuesday November 10, 2015 11:20am - 12:30pm
Location TBD

12:30pm

Luncheon Buffet
Tuesday November 10, 2015 12:30pm - 1:15pm
Plenary Hall 1st floor

1:15pm

Luncheon Plenary
  • Bryan Morry, Executive Director, The Hall at Patriot Place presented by Raytheon
  • Kerri Murphy, Oliver Ames High School, The Hall at Patriot Place 2015 Massachusetts STEM Teacher of the Year
  • Marty Meehan, President, University of Massachusetts
  • Governor Charlie Baker, Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Tuesday November 10, 2015 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Plenary Hall 1st floor

2:15pm

Break
Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:15pm - 2:35pm

2:35pm

A Conversation with Governor Baker’s Workforce Skills Cabinet

Following up on the Governor’s presentation, the Secretaries of Education, Housing & Economic Development, and Labor & Workforce Development will share their views on the needs, challenges, and potential next steps for the Commonwealth as we work to sustain and grow the pool of STEM talent, beginning in early education and continuing through to the workforce. The session will include a panel discussion as well as time for Q&A, both amongst the panelists and from the audience.

Congressman Joe Kennedy III will open the session with Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito providing closing remarks.


Moderator
JC

JD Chesloff

Executive Director, Massachusetts Business Roundtable

Speaker(s)
JA

Jay Ash

Massachusetts Secretary of Housing & Economic Development
CJ

Congressman Joe Kennedy III

Honorary Chair, Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council
JA

James A. Peyser

Massachusetts Secretary of Education
LG

Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito

Co-Chair, Massachusetts STEM Advisory Council
RL

Ronald L. Walker, II

Massachusetts Secretary of Labor & Workforce Development


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD
  • Strand Policy
  • Session Type Speaker Panel/Presentation

2:35pm

APPS FOR GOOD - Socially Responsible App Development in K-12 Curriculum

Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI was one of a handful of NCSSS (National Consortium of Secondary STEM) Schools that piloted the APPS FOR GOOD curriculum from the UK in the Spring of 2015.  In the course, students work together as teams to find real issues they care about and learn to build a mobile, web or social app to solve them. Like professional entrepreneurs, students go through all key aspects of new product development, from idea generation, technical feasibility and programming to product design, deciding on business models and marketing. We will present our pilot program and talk about the successes and challenges of the pilot, including examples of new app designs developed by Mass Academy juniors.  We will highlight our end of the year APPS FAIR as the culminating event of the presentation, including demonstrations of student apps.


Speaker(s)
MB

Michael Barney

Director, Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI
AT

Angela Taricco

Computer Science Teacher, Mass Academy of Math and Science at WPI


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Bringing Students into the Formative Assessment Process: Research Headlines, Resources and Tools

Compelling research around the effectiveness of formative assessment practices suggests that students can, and should be, the primary consumers of their own formative assessment data. The richness of using formative assessment lies in building students’ ownership and involvement in their learning through the use of a collection of specific instructional practices. When used together, these practices outline an effective instructional approach that makes content more accessible for all students, and particularly for struggling learners. These practices center around teaching students to be able to answer for themselves the questions: 1) What goals am I aiming for in my learning? 2) Where am I currently in relation to those goals? 3) If I have not yet met the goals, what do I need to do next to move closer to meeting them?

This workshop will summarize the results of a five-year NSF-funded project to: 1) design a professional development approach and materials to teach mathematics teachers how to effective implement these formative-assessment-related instructional practices, specifically in mathematics instruction, focused on helping students learn to take part in the formative assessment process; and 2) document barriers, challenges, and possible learning trajectories in teachers’ learning of these instructional practices. Workshop participants will learn about several key shifts in teachers’ mindsets and teaching practice around student ownership of and involvement in their learning and will do several hands-on activities that illustrate the approach and resources used in the professional development.


Speaker(s)
SJ

Susan Janssen Creighton

Senior Research Associate, Education Development Center, Inc.
ER

Emily R. Fagan

Senior Research Associate, Education Development Center, Inc.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Digital Resources for STEM Learning and Engagement: Young Children to Teens

How do we insure that students are learning to be creative thinkers in a world of global change and what does that mean for the future of education in the digital age? This session includes a discussion of two digital STEM programs for elementary, middle, and high school students - Plum Landing and Land Science. Developed by WGBH Boston with NSF funding, Plum Landing is designed to support parents, children (ages 6-9 years), and educators in educational settings as well as in out-of-school settings such as afterschool programs, independent camps, and museums. Plum Landing offers a digital curriculum, including animated webisodes, online games, free apps, hands-on science activities, and live-action videos. Developed by the University of Wisconsin’s Epistemic Games Group, in partnership with Mass Audubon, Land Science is a NSF funded project that utilizes virtual Urban Planning internships for middle and high school students in formal and informal settings. Virtual internships are designed to foster creativity and introduce youth to real-world applications for STEM practices and content.

Learn about the successes and challenges of implementing these projects as well as the results of data collected that demonstrate that these types of programs have a significant impact on participants’ environmental science-related habits of mind, understanding of socio-ecological systems, interest in STEM careers, and environmental science content knowledge.


Speaker(s)
avatar for Jennifer Cutraro

Jennifer Cutraro

Editorial Project Director, WGBH/PBS KIDS
I produce education and outreach materials for kids, families, and educators for the Emmy-nominated PBS KIDS ecosystem science series Plum Landing. For our newest project, Plum Rx, I'm working on activities to integrate environmental science learning into park prescriptions and to encourage families in urban settings to explore nature together.
JK

Jen Klein

Project Manager, Mass Audubon
LM

Lisa Marshall

Teacher, Nashua High School and PhD Candidate, Lesley University
CP

Christine Paulsen

Evaluation Director, Concord Evaluation Group
KS

Kris Scopinich

Director of Education, Mass Audubon


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Engaging Elementary Education Majors in STEM: Investigations Impact Science Teaching Efficacy

Science teacher efficacy for elementary education majors tends to be low, impacting their ability to perceive themselves teaching science. Science methods courses for elementary education majors need to address this issue in order for students to fully realize their potential as effective science teachers. This hands-on workshop models open-ended, challenge-type science investigations, used in a science methods course. The investigations are designed to engage elementary education majors in learning and doing science while reflecting on their beliefs about science and being science teachers. Evidence from course assessments show that components of students’ science teacher efficacy were positively impacted following participation in the investigations. Workshop participants will reflect on the concept of science teacher efficacy and how it determines what and how science is taught, experience engaging science investigations, and reflect on the relevancy of the experience to their own practice.


Speaker(s)
FG

Frank Giuliano

Professor, Chemical and Physical Science Department, Westfield State University
TH

Tarin H. Weiss

Associate Professor, Chemical and Physical Science Department, Westfield State University


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

HS Engineering 4.0: Going from One Engineering Class to an Articulated 4-year Science/CVTE Program

Find out about our homegrown curriculum, program expansion and articulation, and engineering infused science classes. Develop your own “next steps” for expanding (or starting) engineering offerings at home.

The goal for this session is to both highlight the need for high school engineering programs and then to demonstrate how a school can build its own engineering program using resources that are already in place in their schools.

Participants will analyze the engineering currently offered at their high schools, compare and contrast science and engineering, and discuss why we should teach high school science AND high school engineering.  

 


Speaker(s)
AW

Amy Winston

Department Head, Science and Technology/Engineering, Newton North High School


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

ITEST Projects in the Out of School Context: Diverse Practices to Reach Underrepresented Youth

The STEM Learning and Research (STELAR) Center, in collaboration with two projects funded by the National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, will present two models promoting STEM among underserved youth. Seeding the Future targets low-income, underrepresented populations in science at the high school level, and FUSE engages young people ages 11-18 in STEM experiences.

Participants in this session will learn about:

(1) the design principles behind each project and how those design principles provide the framework for materials design and program evaluation;

(2) implementation strategies and outcomes that lead to broadening participation and developing important 21st-century skills among young people who are traditionally underrepresented in STEM;

(3) how to leverage partnerships to build, grow, and sustain the work over time;

(4) how the projects leverage evaluation results to implement change to improve the structural aspects of our program; and

(5) how STEM career development and social justice are critical to the engagement of low-income youth in developing interest in science.

Moderator
CE

Caroline E. Parker

Principal Research Scientist, Education Development Center, Inc.

Speaker(s)
GM

G. Michael Barnett

Associate Professor, Boston College Lynch School of Education
DB

David Blustein

Lynch School of Education, Boston College
KJ

Kemi Jona

Research Professor, Northwestern University
MW

Maggie Waldron

Program Director, Office of STEM Education Partnerships, Northwestern University
CW

Catherine Wong

Director of Urban Outreach Initiatives, Boston College Lynch School of Education


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Local Nature and Young Children: A Natural Choice in Support of Learning

Red-tailed hawks, squirrels, sowbugs, buds, leaves, and twigs have an important place in science learning. 

Find out how to use familiar and unfamiliar resources right outside your door to support young children’s STEM learning. Early childhood educators will share many strategies for supporting children’s inherent curiosity and interest.

Hear stories of success, see examples from three different venues, experience simple sensory activities focused on local nature, and envision science learning that everyone can implement – inside and out. Find out more about how we share our love of the outdoors and local nature in the interest of supporting understanding of earth, physical, and life sciences for children ages two to six.  

It’s easy to embrace the natural world and outdoor exploration in support of STEM learning. Find out how nature that is “hyper local” engages children in classification, inquiry, exploration, and questioning. Children are not the only ones who find it interesting!


Speaker(s)
HD

Heather DiGiovanni

Preschool Director, Mass Audubon Habitat Education Center and Wildlife Sanctuary
MM

Marian Miller

Outreach Education Coordinator, Mass Audubon Habitat Education Center and Wildlife Sanctuary



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Make a Joyful Noise: Young Children Explore Sound and Music
This session will cover investigations of sound crossover between art (music), the biology of the senses (hearing), and physical science (acoustics). Find out how to approach all of these in a deep, conceptual way through child-centered discovery using simple materials…with a little "teaching" asked of the session attendees!

Speaker(s)
GN

Greg Nelson

Professor of Early Childhood, Bridgewater State University


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Making STE(A)M: Integrating Project Based Learning and STEM Grades K-12
K–12 teachers, learning coaches, and administrators will be introduced to a lesson development approach that incorporates state and common core frameworks for math, science, history, ELA, and the arts with the Engineering Design Process, project-based learning and hands-on “making.” Presenters will share unit plans and lesson materials that will support session attendees in developing their own curriculum units that engage students and bring STEM into every class. Unit plans for multiple grades and disciplines will be shared. There will truly be something for everyone! Additionally, presenters will share how a STEM learning coach and dedicated MakerSpace have led to embedded professional development for district teachers and increased capacity for PBL and STEM instruction in the Bourne Public Schools.

Speaker(s)
CB

Christine Borning

STEAM Director, Bourne Public Schools
WD

William Dow

ELA Teacher, Bourne High School
AF

Amy Fish

Innovation Studio Facilitator, Bourne Public Schools


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

STEM + M Partnerships

We will be discussing the many ways that our local Workforce Development system is working collaboratively to support the MA STEM state goals and how it relates back to the workforce development systems and our businesses and adult and youth job seekers.  Also, the programs that we’re involved in to expand STEM awareness to both adult and youth in our regional schools.

The session will be about our multi-pronged approaches to filling the current and future employment gaps in STEM companies focusing on manufacturing. We will share best practices found in our organizations, the workforce system, and through our partnerships.  We will emphasize “Promising Practices, Proven Results” over the past year. We will also speak about STEM related activities/work that is occurring within our partnership to reach and prepare adults and youth interested in pursuing STEM+M careers.


Moderator
SS

Sheila Sullivan-Jardim

Executive Director, Brockton Area Workforce Investment Board

Speaker(s)
LA

Lorraine Albert

Director of Regional Training, Brockton Area Workforce Investment Board
DF

Diane Ferrera

Director of Human Resources, AccuRounds
AK

Andrea Kingman

Senior Employer Service Representative, UMass Donahue Institute/Career Works
PM

Paula Martel

Human Resource Manager, North Easton Machine
LP

Leslie Parady

Workforce Development Manager, MassMEP


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Teaching Science to Learn Science

In this interactive panel session, researchers and participants from the NSF-funded Teaching to Learn (T2L) project will engage in a focused discussion with session participants on the ways in which the T2L model may be applicable to their institutions.

The T2L project places pairs of undergraduate students from two four-year liberal arts colleges (one public, one private) into the elementary classrooms of a high-needs public school district to teach science once a week. In this way, college students and elementary teachers play three distinct roles: collaborators, co-teachers, and learners; and the elementary classroom becomes a unique site for an overlapping set of teaching and learning practices. Pairs of undergraduates co-taught science units with elementary classroom teachers and the support of college science education professors over the course of the 2014-2015 school year. Undergraduates and elementary teachers have also participated in joint professional development to deepen their understanding of both the nature of scientific inquiry and science pedagogy and reinforce their connection as a community of learners.


Moderator
NS

Nick Stroud

Assistant Professor of Science and Technology Education, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts

Speaker(s)
MB

Melissa Boyer

Teacher, Greylock Elementary School, North Adams Public Schools
DH

Daniel Heinen

Computer Science major, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts
LO

Lindsay Osterhoudt

Math Coach / K-12 Science Coordinator, North Adams Public Schools
LR

Leslie Rule

Teaching to Learn Supervisor, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts
LW

Lindley Wells

Education Outreach Consultant, Williams College
DW

Dawn Wu

Sophomore, MA College of Liberal Arts


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Understanding the Middle School Science Fair Experience

Recent science education reforms emphasize the importance of having students do real scientific and engineering work because of the opportunities that “doing” science gives students. Science fairs are designed to give students precisely this experience and they have been promoted by education and industry leaders for over a half century. Supporters claim that they accomplish these goals and more, but little research has been done to examine whether and how much impact they have on students or how much they cost. The National Science Foundation has funded Education Development Center to conduct a four-year, national study to answer questions about science fairs including: What do kids gain from science fairs? What makes some science fair experiences better than others? How much does a good science fair cost?

A study of science fairs of this scope has not been conducted in the U.S. before, and this study offers a potentially high-value bridge between the informal and formal science education worlds. The study’s findings have the potential to increase the effectiveness and reach of science fairs, provide science educators—both formal and informal—with cost-effective ways of bringing the science and engineering practices to their students, and provide researchers with tools for assessing the science and engineering practices. We will present our current findings from this study, including insights into the models and outcomes of science fairs, and offer the audience a chance to reflect on their own science fair experiences and connections to the informal science education community.

Speaker(s)
JD

Jackie DeLisi

Research Scientist, Education Development Center, Inc.
AJ

Abigail Jurist Levy

Principal Research Scientist, Education Development Center, Inc.
MP

Marian Pasquale

Senior Research Scientist, Education Development Center, Inc.


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Where are the Middle Skill Jobs?

Broadening Advanced Technological Education Connections (BATEC) has partnered with Burning Glass to analyze labor market data to scope out middle skill jobs in nine are areas of computing. This report provides an in-depth look at nine middle skill occupations: Computer System Analysts, Health Informatics (defined as Medical Record Technicians and Health Information Technicians), Web Developers, Big Data Analysts (defined as Database Administrators, Data Warehousing Specialists, and Business Intelligence Analysts), Computer User Support Specialists, Computer Network Support Specialists, Computer Programmers, Software Developers and Information Security Analysts. This will include an analysis of demand characteristics for top middle-skill IT occupations in key U.S. markets and investigate the size, growth, requirements, and hiring difficulty of the top middle-skill IT-related occupations. Two additional reports allow an in-depth look at jobs in big data and cybersecurity. This session will feature a panel that will engage participants in a discussion about how these research reports can inform programs and impact students within their institutions.


Moderator
DB

Deborah Boisvert

Executive Director, BATEC, University of Massachusetts Boston

Speaker(s)
LP

Lou Piazza

Director, BATEC, University of Massachusetts Boston
MS

Matt Sigelman

CEO, Burning Glass Technologies
CW

Christine Williams

Director of Economic and Workforce Development; Lead, Technology Talent Initiative; MA Department of Higher Education


Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

2:35pm

Writing to Think: Using Notebook Writing to Guide Inquiry-Based Learning in Science

The goal of this session is to illustrate how science notebook writing can be used to support K-12 students in thinking like a scientist, mastering science content, and developing strong writing skills. Science notebook writing can guide thinking through the inquiry process as students make predictions, record observations, reason using evidence, and communicate their findings. At another level, it provides a mechanism through which students can articulate their beliefs about the natural world, hold up evidence to reflect on the accuracy of their beliefs, and clarify misconceptions. And by engaging in writing that is purposeful, students will at the same time build skills that address many ELA writing standards. Who will benefit from this workshop? Every K-12 science teacher is charged with guiding student growth in science practices, science content, AND English literacy, so all can benefit. Workshop participants will be introduced to a notebook format used for science inquiry in the Braintree Public Schools, which we believe contributes to the strong performance the district achieves on the science MCAS. We will examine the notebook to identify how each part guides and extends science thinking, while developing writing skills. We'll have fun doing some inquiry science ourselves to practice using the notebooks. We'll examine student work to see how notebooks can be used for both formative and summative assessment. Participants will leave with a generic format that can be adapted to their own curriculum, as well as with an assessment rubric appropriate for upper elementary students. Teachers are encouraged to come with one of their own lessons in mind to see how it might be adapted to the inquiry format and supported with science notebook writing.

 


Speaker(s)
DR

Dianne Rees

Director of Science K-12, Braintree Public Schools



Tuesday November 10, 2015 2:35pm - 3:45pm
Location TBD

4:00pm

Exhibit Hall Closes
Tuesday November 10, 2015 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Exhibit Hall 1st floor